Easy A- “Let’s not and say we did”

“Easy A” a film directed by Will Gluck, a 2010 American teen comedy film starring Emma Stone. Emma Stone plays a high-school student who breaks taboos without really breaking them. That makes her the perfect heroine for a movie that knows the rules of high-school comedies, tweaks them, but still colors within the lines.

Writer Bert V. Royal alternates between genuinely witty touches and dialogue that just has the rhythm of wit. Between the clever dialogues and the equally breathless editing, the film’s characters scarcely have room to breathe.

Emma being Olive Penderghast, from East Ojai High School who is nobody at all until such time that there were rumors spread about her losing her virginity. And the biggest thing about the school is that it is scandalous to lose one’s virginity in high school.

She was overheard by Marianne played by Amanda Bynes, a self-righteous type of women who spread rumors without fully knowing the truth and pass it like an object.

But Stone chooses to let some false rumors about her sexual promiscuity spread, it’s not just about she does not care at all but she somehow likes the attention. But the truth behind that false rumor is that she is just simply embarrassed to admit that she spent the whole weekends at home alone, and just come up a story that she lost her virginity to some college guy. As she became the icon turns to someone who falsely accused, she started to wear a red “A” in tribute to Hawthorne’s sexual outcast and the Scarlet Letter.

The plot unrolls predictably, but beneath the conspiracy, thinly conceived religious bad guys, and hit-or-miss one-liners, Easy A has a deep concern with sexual double standards and the evading that awaits those who don’t conform to them, from gay kids to sexually assertive girls to dateless introvert boys. Emma Stone plays the part with the mix of sourness and vulnerability, drawing power from everyone’s false assumptions as she charms down the hallways one moment, appearing overwhelmed by the same assumptions the next.

Olive puts her fame to use. She has a gay friend named Brandon portrayed by Dan Byrd, who has been bullied at school because of his sexuality. By allowing word to get out that she and Brandon have shared blissful night, she is able to bring an end to the bullying of Dan.

Now that she had somehow an authority in school, she begins to issue of her Seal of Approval in and outside of her school, the misfits and untouchables in the student government, equipped them with the quality of being sexy.

The film shows how Emma Stone build up strong personality despite being called a lot of dirty names. The film provides examples of the attitude of both men and women. She does not care whether she is a woman she knows how to fight for herself. Isn’t it what feminists are trying to show? That every woman can stand on their own. But a lot of people are trying to argue that men cannot be in the same situation with women. Just like how easy A showed (Caprino K., 2017).


Easy A, like other good comedy films, it supplies with more or less conventional film. Emma Stone’s transformation is introduced by gossip. She wanted the power to improve not just her reputations, but the others as well. And she also had the chance to help the relationship between his favorite professor, Mr. Griffith played by Thomas Haden Church and his wife, which is their guidance counselor in school.

The movie became hit it is not just because it is funny, but it is also smart. Because when Olive begins wearing the scarlet letter “A” on her clothes, adopt the idea from the Hawthome novel which is the Scarlet Heart that their professor explained at the beginning of the film.

References

https://www.forbes.com/sites/kathycaprino/2017/03/08/what-is-feminism-and-why-do-so-many-women-and-men-hate-it/#5cabd18d7e8e

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Easy_A

http://www.nerdyfeminist.com/2010/09/easy-gets-a.html

http://notanotherwave.blogspot.com/2010/10/easy-feminist-film-review.html

http://feminismsaywhat.blogspot.com/2012/05/easy-double-standard-of-womens.html

-Kristle Vital-

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